Scientists recreate voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest mummy


  • Scientists were able to reproduce a single vowel sound.
  • Nesyamun lived during the politically volatile reign of pharaoh Ramses XI.
  • His voice was an essential part of his ritual duties, which involved spoken as well as sung elements.

Scientists have recreated the voice of an ancient, 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummy using 3D printing, medical scanners and an electronic larynx, a new study suggests.

They were able to reproduce a single vowel sound, which sounds like something between the vowels in the words “bed” and “bad.”

The tone is unlikely to be an exact replication of the speech of Egyptian priest Nesyamun, whose mummified body the researchers worked with, because the tongue has lost much of its bulk over 3,000 years.

“We have made a faithful sound for his tract in its current position, but we would not expect an exact speech match given his tongue state,” said co-author David M. Howard of London’s Royal Holloway college.

Nesyamun lived during the politically volatile reign of pharaoh Ramses XI (c.1099–1069 B.C.), working as a scribe and priest at the state temple of Karnak in Thebes, which is modern Luxor.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *